Clownfish, Philippines. Photo by Stephane Rochon.

Atlas miejsc nurkowych tworzony przez nurków dla nurków
Baw się i pomagaj!

 Lartington

Bermuda

Inne miejsca:

Ta mapa jest interaktywna! Użyj kontrolek celem przybliżenia i oddalenia.

Data: WGS84 [ Pomocy ]
Dokładność: W przybliżeniu

Historia GPS (3)

Szerokość geograficzna: 32° 21.6' N
Długość geograficzna: 64° 54.6' W

Ocena użytkownika (0)


  • Ulubione
  • Twoje ulubione i przyszłe miejsca nurkowe

    Dodaj miejsce do swojego profilu

 Dostęp

Jak? Łodzią

Odległość Dobry czas na łodzi (< 30min)

Łatwo znaleźć? 

 Charakterystyka miejsca nurkowego

Przeciętna głebokość 8 m / 26.2 ft

maksymalna głębokość 10.7 m / 35.1 ft

Prąd Powoli( < 1 knot)

Widoczność Dobry ( 10 - 30 m)

Jakość

Jakość miejsca nurkowania Dobry

Doświadczenie Dla każdego nurka

Interesujący biologicznie Interesujący

Więcej informacji

Ilość nurków w tygodniu 

Ilość nurków w week-end 

Nurkowanie typu

- Wrak

Aktywności w miejscu

- Trening nurkowy

Niebezpieczeństwa

 Dodatkowe informacje

English (Przetłumacz ten tekst w Polski): The Lartington was an early vintage freighter that crashed into Bermuda reefs on December 14, 1879. The old steamer had departed Savannah Georgia for Russia with a cargo of cotton.

Her voyage was not an easy one; she encountered numerous storms and heavy seas. A giant wave cracked her hull, causing a massive leak.

The ship's water pumps could not keep ahead of the incoming sea and the captain decided to make a run towards Bermuda.

She never made it. Instead, the unlucky ship ran aground on the reef five miles northwest of the Royal Naval Dockyard (Kings Wharf).

The crew abandoned the ship in lifeboats and was soon spotted and towed into Hamilton by a pilot boat.

The Marine Board of Inquiry attributed the stranding to gross negligence and carelessness. The Captain should have taken information for depth and should never have altered his course.


Subsequent storms scattered remains of this Bermuda's famous shipwreck, but her bow section is fairly intact.

She lies in 15 to 30 feet of water with her steam boilers, stern section and propeller still visible.

There is quite often a large Margate or a black fin Grouper underneath the bow. By the stern, keep your eyes open for the resident school of French Grunts, which will upon your approach surround you.

In the sand pockets around the wreck, you can see Purple Heart Sea Urchins. To the south of the wreck just beyond the bow, you will find a huge head of coral. There is a small cave on the eastern side, which typically houses between five and ten large Spiny Lobsters.

This is also a fairly good area for finding shells, especially Tellin's. Look out for Eagle Rays feeding off the Heart Urchins in the large sand beds.

The visibility on this wreck is usually fairly good, averaging 70 feet in the summer to well in excess of 200 feet during the winter months.

The wreck is located less than a five minute boat ride from the Constellation,

English (Przetłumacz ten tekst w Polski): The Lartington was an early vintage freighter that crashed into Bermuda reefs on December 14, 1879. The old steamer had departed Savannah Georgia for Russia with a cargo of cotton.

Her voyage was not an easy one; she encountered numerous storms and heavy seas. A giant wave cracked her hull, causing a massive leak.

The ship's water pumps could not keep ahead of the incoming sea and the captain decided to make a run towards Bermuda.

She never made it. Instead, the unlucky ship ran aground on the reef five miles northwest of the Royal Naval Dockyard (Kings Wharf).

The crew abandoned the ship in lifeboats and was soon spotted and towed into Hamilton by a pilot boat.

The Marine Board of Inquiry attributed the stranding to gross negligence and carelessness. The Captain should have taken information for depth and should never have altered his course.


Subsequent storms scattered remains of this Bermuda's famous shipwreck, but her bow section is fairly intact.

She lies in 15 to 30 feet of water with her steam boilers, stern section and propeller still visible.

There is quite often a large Margate or a black fin Grouper underneath the bow. By the stern, keep your eyes open for the resident school of French Grunts, which will upon your approach surround you.

In the sand pockets around the wreck, you can see Purple Heart Sea Urchins. To the south of the wreck just beyond the bow, you will find a huge head of coral. There is a small cave on the eastern side, which typically houses between five and ten large Spiny Lobsters.

This is also a fairly good area for finding shells, especially Tellin's. Look out for Eagle Rays feeding off the Heart Urchins in the large sand beds.

The visibility on this wreck is usually fairly good, averaging 70 feet in the summer to well in excess of 200 feet during the winter months.

The wreck is located less than a five minute boat ride from the Constellation,

The Lartington was an early vintage freighter that crashed into Bermuda reefs on December 14, 1879. The old steamer had departed Savannah Georgia for Russia with a cargo of cotton.

Her voyage was not an easy one; she encountered numerous storms and heavy seas. A giant wave cracked her hull, causing a massive leak.

The ship's water pumps could not keep ahead of the incoming sea and the captain decided to make a run towards Bermuda.

She never made it. Instead, the unlucky ship ran aground on the reef five miles northwest of the Royal Naval Dockyard (Kings Wharf).

The crew abandoned the ship in lifeboats and was soon spotted and towed into Hamilton by a pilot boat.

The Marine Board of Inquiry attributed the stranding to gross negligence and carelessness. The Captain should have taken information for depth and should never have altered his course.


Subsequent storms scattered remains of this Bermuda's famous shipwreck, but her bow section is fairly intact.

She lies in 15 to 30 feet of water with her steam boilers, stern section and propeller still visible.

There is quite often a large Margate or a black fin Grouper underneath the bow. By the stern, keep your eyes open for the resident school of French Grunts, which will upon your approach surround you.

In the sand pockets around the wreck, you can see Purple Heart Sea Urchins. To the south of the wreck just beyond the bow, you will find a huge head of coral. There is a small cave on the eastern side, which typically houses between five and ten large Spiny Lobsters.

This is also a fairly good area for finding shells, especially Tellin's. Look out for Eagle Rays feeding off the Heart Urchins in the large sand beds.

The visibility on this wreck is usually fairly good, averaging 70 feet in the summer to well in excess of 200 feet during the winter months.

The wreck is located less than a five minute boat ride from the Constellation,

English (Przetłumacz ten tekst w Polski): The Lartington was an early vintage freighter that crashed into Bermuda reefs on December 14, 1879. The old steamer had departed Savannah Georgia for Russia with a cargo of cotton.

Her voyage was not an easy one; she encountered numerous storms and heavy seas. A giant wave cracked her hull, causing a massive leak.

The ship's water pumps could not keep ahead of the incoming sea and the captain decided to make a run towards Bermuda.

She never made it. Instead, the unlucky ship ran aground on the reef five miles northwest of the Royal Naval Dockyard (Kings Wharf).

The crew abandoned the ship in lifeboats and was soon spotted and towed into Hamilton by a pilot boat.

The Marine Board of Inquiry attributed the stranding to gross negligence and carelessness. The Captain should have taken information for depth and should never have altered his course.


Subsequent storms scattered remains of this Bermuda's famous shipwreck, but her bow section is fairly intact.

She lies in 15 to 30 feet of water with her steam boilers, stern section and propeller still visible.

There is quite often a large Margate or a black fin Grouper underneath the bow. By the stern, keep your eyes open for the resident school of French Grunts, which will upon your approach surround you.

In the sand pockets around the wreck, you can see Purple Heart Sea Urchins. To the south of the wreck just beyond the bow, you will find a huge head of coral. There is a small cave on the eastern side, which typically houses between five and ten large Spiny Lobsters.

This is also a fairly good area for finding shells, especially Tellin's. Look out for Eagle Rays feeding off the Heart Urchins in the large sand beds.

The visibility on this wreck is usually fairly good, averaging 70 feet in the summer to well in excess of 200 feet during the winter months.

The wreck is located less than a five minute boat ride from the Constellation,

English (Przetłumacz ten tekst w Polski): The Lartington was an early vintage freighter that crashed into Bermuda reefs on December 14, 1879. The old steamer had departed Savannah Georgia for Russia with a cargo of cotton.

Her voyage was not an easy one; she encountered numerous storms and heavy seas. A giant wave cracked her hull, causing a massive leak.

The ship's water pumps could not keep ahead of the incoming sea and the captain decided to make a run towards Bermuda.

She never made it. Instead, the unlucky ship ran aground on the reef five miles northwest of the Royal Naval Dockyard (Kings Wharf).

The crew abandoned the ship in lifeboats and was soon spotted and towed into Hamilton by a pilot boat.

The Marine Board of Inquiry attributed the stranding to gross negligence and carelessness. The Captain should have taken information for depth and should never have altered his course.


Subsequent storms scattered remains of this Bermuda's famous shipwreck, but her bow section is fairly intact.

She lies in 15 to 30 feet of water with her steam boilers, stern section and propeller still visible.

There is quite often a large Margate or a black fin Grouper underneath the bow. By the stern, keep your eyes open for the resident school of French Grunts, which will upon your approach surround you.

In the sand pockets around the wreck, you can see Purple Heart Sea Urchins. To the south of the wreck just beyond the bow, you will find a huge head of coral. There is a small cave on the eastern side, which typically houses between five and ten large Spiny Lobsters.

This is also a fairly good area for finding shells, especially Tellin's. Look out for Eagle Rays feeding off the Heart Urchins in the large sand beds.

The visibility on this wreck is usually fairly good, averaging 70 feet in the summer to well in excess of 200 feet during the winter months.

The wreck is located less than a five minute boat ride from the Constellation,

English (Przetłumacz ten tekst w Polski): The Lartington was an early vintage freighter that crashed into Bermuda reefs on December 14, 1879. The old steamer had departed Savannah Georgia for Russia with a cargo of cotton.

Her voyage was not an easy one; she encountered numerous storms and heavy seas. A giant wave cracked her hull, causing a massive leak.

The ship's water pumps could not keep ahead of the incoming sea and the captain decided to make a run towards Bermuda.

She never made it. Instead, the unlucky ship ran aground on the reef five miles northwest of the Royal Naval Dockyard (Kings Wharf).

The crew abandoned the ship in lifeboats and was soon spotted and towed into Hamilton by a pilot boat.

The Marine Board of Inquiry attributed the stranding to gross negligence and carelessness. The Captain should have taken information for depth and should never have altered his course.


Subsequent storms scattered remains of this Bermuda's famous shipwreck, but her bow section is fairly intact.

She lies in 15 to 30 feet of water with her steam boilers, stern section and propeller still visible.

There is quite often a large Margate or a black fin Grouper underneath the bow. By the stern, keep your eyes open for the resident school of French Grunts, which will upon your approach surround you.

In the sand pockets around the wreck, you can see Purple Heart Sea Urchins. To the south of the wreck just beyond the bow, you will find a huge head of coral. There is a small cave on the eastern side, which typically houses between five and ten large Spiny Lobsters.

This is also a fairly good area for finding shells, especially Tellin's. Look out for Eagle Rays feeding off the Heart Urchins in the large sand beds.

The visibility on this wreck is usually fairly good, averaging 70 feet in the summer to well in excess of 200 feet during the winter months.

The wreck is located less than a five minute boat ride from the Constellation,

English (Przetłumacz ten tekst w Polski): The Lartington was an early vintage freighter that crashed into Bermuda reefs on December 14, 1879. The old steamer had departed Savannah Georgia for Russia with a cargo of cotton.

Her voyage was not an easy one; she encountered numerous storms and heavy seas. A giant wave cracked her hull, causing a massive leak.

The ship's water pumps could not keep ahead of the incoming sea and the captain decided to make a run towards Bermuda.

She never made it. Instead, the unlucky ship ran aground on the reef five miles northwest of the Royal Naval Dockyard (Kings Wharf).

The crew abandoned the ship in lifeboats and was soon spotted and towed into Hamilton by a pilot boat.

The Marine Board of Inquiry attributed the stranding to gross negligence and carelessness. The Captain should have taken information for depth and should never have altered his course.


Subsequent storms scattered remains of this Bermuda's famous shipwreck, but her bow section is fairly intact.

She lies in 15 to 30 feet of water with her steam boilers, stern section and propeller still visible.

There is quite often a large Margate or a black fin Grouper underneath the bow. By the stern, keep your eyes open for the resident school of French Grunts, which will upon your approach surround you.

In the sand pockets around the wreck, you can see Purple Heart Sea Urchins. To the south of the wreck just beyond the bow, you will find a huge head of coral. There is a small cave on the eastern side, which typically houses between five and ten large Spiny Lobsters.

This is also a fairly good area for finding shells, especially Tellin's. Look out for Eagle Rays feeding off the Heart Urchins in the large sand beds.

The visibility on this wreck is usually fairly good, averaging 70 feet in the summer to well in excess of 200 feet during the winter months.

The wreck is located less than a five minute boat ride from the Constellation,

English (Przetłumacz ten tekst w Polski): The Lartington was an early vintage freighter that crashed into Bermuda reefs on December 14, 1879. The old steamer had departed Savannah Georgia for Russia with a cargo of cotton.

Her voyage was not an easy one; she encountered numerous storms and heavy seas. A giant wave cracked her hull, causing a massive leak.

The ship's water pumps could not keep ahead of the incoming sea and the captain decided to make a run towards Bermuda.

She never made it. Instead, the unlucky ship ran aground on the reef five miles northwest of the Royal Naval Dockyard (Kings Wharf).

The crew abandoned the ship in lifeboats and was soon spotted and towed into Hamilton by a pilot boat.

The Marine Board of Inquiry attributed the stranding to gross negligence and carelessness. The Captain should have taken information for depth and should never have altered his course.


Subsequent storms scattered remains of this Bermuda's famous shipwreck, but her bow section is fairly intact.

She lies in 15 to 30 feet of water with her steam boilers, stern section and propeller still visible.

There is quite often a large Margate or a black fin Grouper underneath the bow. By the stern, keep your eyes open for the resident school of French Grunts, which will upon your approach surround you.

In the sand pockets around the wreck, you can see Purple Heart Sea Urchins. To the south of the wreck just beyond the bow, you will find a huge head of coral. There is a small cave on the eastern side, which typically houses between five and ten large Spiny Lobsters.

This is also a fairly good area for finding shells, especially Tellin's. Look out for Eagle Rays feeding off the Heart Urchins in the large sand beds.

The visibility on this wreck is usually fairly good, averaging 70 feet in the summer to well in excess of 200 feet during the winter months.

The wreck is located less than a five minute boat ride from the Constellation,

English (Przetłumacz ten tekst w Polski): The Lartington was an early vintage freighter that crashed into Bermuda reefs on December 14, 1879. The old steamer had departed Savannah Georgia for Russia with a cargo of cotton.

Her voyage was not an easy one; she encountered numerous storms and heavy seas. A giant wave cracked her hull, causing a massive leak.

The ship's water pumps could not keep ahead of the incoming sea and the captain decided to make a run towards Bermuda.

She never made it. Instead, the unlucky ship ran aground on the reef five miles northwest of the Royal Naval Dockyard (Kings Wharf).

The crew abandoned the ship in lifeboats and was soon spotted and towed into Hamilton by a pilot boat.

The Marine Board of Inquiry attributed the stranding to gross negligence and carelessness. The Captain should have taken information for depth and should never have altered his course.


Subsequent storms scattered remains of this Bermuda's famous shipwreck, but her bow section is fairly intact.

She lies in 15 to 30 feet of water with her steam boilers, stern section and propeller still visible.

There is quite often a large Margate or a black fin Grouper underneath the bow. By the stern, keep your eyes open for the resident school of French Grunts, which will upon your approach surround you.

In the sand pockets around the wreck, you can see Purple Heart Sea Urchins. To the south of the wreck just beyond the bow, you will find a huge head of coral. There is a small cave on the eastern side, which typically houses between five and ten large Spiny Lobsters.

This is also a fairly good area for finding shells, especially Tellin's. Look out for Eagle Rays feeding off the Heart Urchins in the large sand beds.

The visibility on this wreck is usually fairly good, averaging 70 feet in the summer to well in excess of 200 feet during the winter months.

The wreck is located less than a five minute boat ride from the Constellation,

 Zdjecia

Pokaż wszystko (0)...

Brak dostępnych zdjęć

 Filmy

Pokaż wszystko (0)...

Film niedostępny

 Dive logs

Dodaj divelog

Pokaż wszystko (2)...

Griffith avatar
Lartington
Por Griffith
27 jun 2006
Wreck Dive - In 3100 PSI  Out 1700 PSI 11lbs w/ Diveskin Temp 77F  Vis 60ft Boat entry w/ Dive Bermuda Saw  Grouper
Más...
Griffith avatar
Lartington
Por Griffith
26 jun 2006
Wreck Dive - In 3100 PSI  Out 1800 PSI 12lbs w/ Diveskin Temp 77F  Vis 60ft Boat entry w/ Dive Bermuda Saw  Grouper, Lionfish
Más...

 Wycieczki nurkowe

Dodaj podróż

Pokaż wszystko (1)...

Griffith avatar
Viaje: Bermuda 2006
Por Griffith
De 25 jun 2006 a 28 jun 2006

Más...

 Komentarze

Dodaj komentarz

Pokaż wszystko (0)...

To będzie pierwszy komentarz o tym kraju

Błąd, powiadom nas o błędzie

możesz skorygować te błędy lub dodać informacje. Jeśli masz problemy odwiedź ta stronę, Wyślij nam odpowiedź zwrotną.

Wannadive.net 24/24

Wannadive.net na Twoim urządzeniu mobilnym

Google Play Application

RSS Wszystkie kanały RSS Wannadive.net

Biuletyn Wiadomości na email

Friends of Wannadive